U.S. Marijuana Markets

There are three types of marijuana markets operating in the United States: illicit markets, state-approved medical marijuana markets, and state-approved personal use/recreational markets. Federally, these three are considered
illicit; however, these markets operate differently and are best described independently. Criminal
traffickers obtain supplies from all three markets, as well as foreign-produced marijuana trafficked into the United States.

Outlook
Domestic use of marijuana remains high and
is likely to increase as the prevalence of state
legalization continues to lower the perception
of risk to users and potential users. The high
availability of high-potency marijuana, marijuana
concentrate products, and trendy paraphernalia
will likely continue to entice users and potential
users. Domestic production and trafficking of
marijuana will likely increase as more states
adopt or change current marijuana laws to
establish medical or recreational marijuana
markets, allowing criminals to exploit state
legality.
Mexico-produced marijuana will continue to
be trafficked into the United States in bulk
quantities and may increase in quality to
compete with domestic-produced marijuana.

Marijuana Legalization has breeds a bigger black market

California

Marijuana in California: How the state’s legalization of weed has not destroyed the black market.

When voters legalized marijuana three years ago, advocates said illegal operations would be pushed out and the state would make hundreds of millions in tax revenue. So far, those dreams have not panned out.

Colorado’s Marijuana Black Market

RMHIDTA Colorado Drug Task Forces (10) conducted 257 investigations of black
market marijuana in Colorado resulting in:
o 192 felony arrests
o 6.08 tons of marijuana seized
o 60,091 marijuana plants seized
o 25 different states the marijuana was destined
• Seizures of Colorado marijuana in the U.S. mail system has increased 1,042 percent from
an average of 52 parcels (2009-2012) to an average of 594 parcels (2013-2017) during the
time recreational marijuana has been legal.

Denver 7 abc reports: 7 indicted in human trafficking ring involving Denver massage parlorson

DENVER — Authorities on Thursday announced the indictments of seven people in a human trafficking ring involving illegal massage parlors in Denver and Aurora. The suspect used some of the profits from the massage parlors to fund illegal marijuana grow houses, officials said.

How a marijuana network tied to China became a player on the Colorado black market

Ryan Osborne reported on Dec 20, 2019:

LOVELAND, Colo. – The home on Donath Avenue in Loveland sold for just shy of $400,000 in 2017, and it was easy to see why: Four bedrooms, three bathrooms, a spacious basement, a two-car garage.